Hay Budden Anvil Serial Numbers

  1. Hay Budden Manufacturing Company
  2. Hay Budden Anvil History
  3. Hay Budden Anvil Serial Numbers 131514
  4. Hay Budden Anvil Serial Numbers

> More to the point, amongst the nearly complete set of blacksmith >tools I am now the proud owner of is the anvil. It is marked >underneath the horn, on the foot, with a series of stamped >numbers/letters. The first character looks like a capital T with a >capital Z that has been rotated clockwise 45 degrees stamped over the >top of the T; not above it, but in the same space as the T. >Following that is '157' a bit of a space, and then 'A86799' I have >not found any other legible markings.

I recently came across a Hay-Budden blacksmithing anvil. I believe its ~150 pounds. (Theres a 1 -space- 52 stamped on the right side under the company name, etc.) Can someone please post a (complete) range of Hay-Budden serial numbers vs. Manufacturing dates?

Hay Budden Manufacturing Company

All the characters are about >1/2' tall. The anvil has a seam visible at the waist, and a fine line >visible where the top plate is attached. It has both a hardie and >pritchel hole also. It has a nice ring to it when struck.

Budden

> Is that enough information for anyone to identify the beast? >Brad Heuver Brad, as I wrote you earlier I believed this anvil to be a Hay-Budden.

Last night I reread the Hay-Budden section in Richard Postman's 'Anvils in America', (just published and by far the best work on the subject available!), and I think I found the clincher! 'There is one other diference in those anvils with the 'A' prefix. The number on the front of the waist under the horn is always a '4'. Somtimes the '4' is upside down.'

This 'upside down `4' sure sounds like your 'T-Z' mark. Please double check the serial though the 'A' series are not listed as having gone as far as the 80K's, (if it is a 30K number it was made in the early 1920's) BTW although two british firms Mousehole and Peter Wright used the old hundredweight system of marking, most of the american firms did not. They used a simple weight stamp. Hay-Budden also used a 1-3 digit stamp that is believed to refer to the lot of steel used in its construction so if the 157 is not indicative of the weight it is probably this lot number) Another sign of the Hay-Budden is the 'hourglass shape' of the indentation on the bottom of the anvil, (actually a fairly thin rim that projects down from the edge of the base and so follows the base's contours.) [I told you it was a *good* book.) Thomas Powers Columbus, Ohio (once a major anvil manufacturing center!) Gene Olson 2/10/1998, 0:00 น.

In article, Gene Olson wrote: > Well, as long as we are in ID mode. > (what the heck as long as it works) > > I bought an anvil new in about 1971. > > I would describe it as cast steel. > It is marked England on one side and 77 kg on the other. > It has a very thick heel and 1 1/4 in hardee hole. > It was painted blue. It is a lively anvil.

Wondershare dr fone free download. > > Any of you Brits know anything about it's Mfr? Sounds like a Brooks anvil.

They are still available new from Centaur Forge. Record also sells some small anvils. -- STAGESMITH PRODUCTIONS Custom Metal Fabrication ABANA AWS SCA IATSE Local 15/488 Renton, Washington, US Paul Stevens, 0:00 น.

Hay Budden Anvil History

William thomas powers wrote: > > Brad, as I wrote you earlier I believed this anvil to be a Hay-Budden. > Last night I reread the Hay-Budden section in Richard Postman's > 'Anvils in America', (just published and by far the best work on the > subject available!), and I think I found the clincher! (snip) I haven't found 'Anvils in America' yet, but I've added it to my list of books for future additions to the personal library. Sounds like interesting reading. > BTW although two british firms Mousehole and Peter Wright used the > old hundredweight system of marking, most of the american firms did > not. They used a simple weight stamp.

Hay Budden Anvil Serial Numbers 131514

Hay-Budden also used > a 1-3 digit stamp that is believed to refer to the lot of steel > used in its construction so if the 157 is not indicative of the > weight it is probably this lot number) Would I be correct in interpreting the markings on the side of an anvil: M & H ARMITAGE MOUSE HOLE 0. 21 to mean that it is a 105 lb Mousehole anvil? I haven't been able to find any other markings (the sides were a bit rusty). The hardie hole is 3/4' and the pritchel hole is about 1/2'.

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Hay Budden Anvil Serial Numbers

There is a seam where the face was attached, and a barely visible seam at the waist. There are three square holes, maybe an inch and a half deep; two on the waist (I've seen pictures of these being used to hold or hoist the anvil during manufacture and refacing), and one in the center of the base (underneath - haven't figured out what it's for yet). What other measurements would be helpful in confirming an identification (or narrowing down the age)? I haven't taken the time (yet) to learn much about the history of the various anvil makers.